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The woman in white plot

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Sir Percival is a man of many secrets — is one of them connected to the strange appearances of a young woman dressed all in white? And what does his charismatic friend, Count Fosco, with his pet white mice running in and out of his brightly coloured waistcoat, have to do with it all? Marian and the girls' drawing master, Walter, have to turn detective in order to work out what is going on, and to protect Laura from a fatal plot. Wilkie Collins. Wilkie Collins was born in London on 8 January

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The Woman In White

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins ,.

Matthew Sweet Annotations. There, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth, stood the figure of a solitary Woman, dressed from head to foot in white' The Woman in White famously opens with Walter Hartright's eerie encounter on a moonlit London road. Engaged as a drawing master to the beautiful Laura Fairlie, Walter become 'In one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop Engaged as a drawing master to the beautiful Laura Fairlie, Walter becomes embroiled in the sinister intrigues of Sir Percival Glyde and his 'charming' friend Count Fosco, who has a taste for white mice, vanilla bonbons, and poison.

Pursuing questions of identity and insanity along the paths and corridors of English country houses and the madhouse, The Woman in White is the first and most influential of the Victorian genre that combined Gothic horror with psychological realism. Matthew Sweet's introduction explores the phenomenon of Victorian 'sensation' fiction, and discusses Wilkie Collins's biographical and societal influences.

Included in this edition are appendices on theatrical adaptations of the novel and its serialisation history. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published February 27th by Penguin Classics first published November 26th More Details Original Title. Audie Award for Classic Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Woman in White , please sign up.

At that time, Laura was officially deceased. In reality, Laura was still alive, and her half-sister Anne Catherick layed in the tomb with Laura's name on it. But, only a few people knew and accepted that. The legal paper trail all stated it was Laura that was deceased.

David This answer contains spoilers… view spoiler [ Presumably Laura might have been required to produce copies of her birth certificate and Sir Percival's death certificate in order to get married, but …more Presumably Laura might have been required to produce copies of her birth certificate and Sir Percival's death certificate in order to get married, but she wouldn't have been required to produce her own death certificate. There's an amusing paradox here. When asked if she knew of any legal reason why she couldn't marry Walter, she was hardly going to admit, "I can't marry him because I'm dead.

The biggest problem I can see is that they would have had to give the registrar 21 days notice of their intention to marry, so would have been banking on Fosco and his spies not paying attention to the official announcements during that 21 day period.

I don't know how widely the information would have been broadcast in , but it would have been quite a risk. Although I imagine it was a lot easier to get away with that kind of deception with no Facebook and the like to spread the news around.

Bear in mind also that Sir Percival legitimised his own claims to his title simply by doctoring the official register - it was as easy as that in This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [I don't know if this was answered in the book, but why did Laura's father request her to marry sir Glyde? Gazal It is a hunch since the writer has never portrayed the true relationship between Sir Percival and Laura's father.

It can be determined that Sir Perciv …more It is a hunch since the writer has never portrayed the true relationship between Sir Percival and Laura's father. It can be determined that Sir Percival somehow or the other managed to maintain his charm with Laura's father or he might have blackmailed her father with Anne's secret. The family name and honour was the uppermost in those days hence it might be the latter.

See all 25 questions about The Woman in White…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Woman in White. Nov 25, Bill Kerwin rated it it was amazing Shelves: 19th-c-brit , gothic , detective-mystery. The only real flaw in this densely plotted page-turner of a novel is that in the end it slightly disappoints because it promises more than it delivers. It makes the reader fall in love with its plain but resourceful heroine Marian Halcombe, and teases us with the delightful prospect that she will become the principal agent bringing the villains to justice.

When, in the middle of the novel, Marian tells her half-sister Laura that "our endurance must end, and our resistance begin," it seems like a The only real flaw in this densely plotted page-turner of a novel is that in the end it slightly disappoints because it promises more than it delivers.

When, in the middle of the novel, Marian tells her half-sister Laura that "our endurance must end, and our resistance begin," it seems like a groundbreaking feminist principle, and a little later Collins gives us the perfect metaphor for liberation when Marian divests herself of much of her cumbersome Victorian clothing so that she may safely climb out on a roof to eavesdrop on her enemies.

Nevertheless, the intricate resolution is absorbing even if the last hundred pages seem too crowded and rushed and the ending although perhaps too pat is satisfying. Oh, I almost forgot to mention Count Fosco! He is--particularly in Marian's grudgingly admiring description--one of the most fascinating and dangerous villains of all mystery fiction. View all 63 comments. Beware of spoilers! What I learned from this book in no particular order : 1.

Italians are excitable, dedicated to the opera, and most likely to be involved with organized crime. Beware of fat, jolly Italian counts with submissive wives and fondness of white mice and canaries. Watch out if your newly wed husband lives in a stately pile with an abandoned wing full of creepy Elizabethan furniture.

If the said ancestral house is surrounded by dark ponds and eerie woods, expect the worst. A Ba Beware of spoilers! A Baronet is not always noble, and his impressive manor and estate might be mortgaged to the hilt. Instead of being the lady of the house, you might be forced to pay HIS debts. Make sure that the marriage settlement is settled in your favor before marrying. Never marry for convenience or enter into any legal agreement when you are: a.

Intelligent, resourceful women are likely to be mannish, and even actually HAVE a mustache, but are strong and have good figures. They can also be relied on to provide intelligent conversation when your beautiful but fragile wives are too busy swooning.

Shutting yourself up in a medieval vestry full of combustible materials with a candle for lighting is NOT advisable. Always have your minions do the dirty work. So is knowing some secret that you might accidentally blurt out to strangers. You CAN marry someone who is legally dead. Nobody bothered to check the civil registry records in those good old days.

Postscript Lately, I have received several personal messages that accused me, based on point 1 in my review above, of being prejudiced toward Italians something which couldn't be further from the truth. For those who hold such view, I would like to point out that my review is a parody which involves humorous, satiric or ironic imitations of the plot, characters or point of views set forth in the novel.

The "This is what I learned" heading is a part of the whole exercise, and does not mean that I personally subscribe to the points enumerated therein. I'm aware that my sense of humor is not to everyone's taste, but it has never been my intention to denigrate Italians or any other ethnic groups in this review or any other review of mine.

View all 90 comments. Shelves: 5-stars. If you don't, you'll think The Woman in White is terribly overwrought and pages too long. If you like Victorian writing, you'll think this is a well-drawn, balanced novel with characters to root for, characters to despise, a twisting plot that rolls up seamlessly, and narrated ingeniously from multiple points of view.

If you're unsure whether you like or dislike Victorian writing, this book is an outstanding introductory choice, and it's one that I recommend unreservedly, to you and to my friends. The most prominent, intrinsic hurdle of The Woman in White is the writing. If you haven't had exposure to authors such as Charles Dickens, Henry James, Victor Hugo, the Bronte sisters, Oliver Wendell Holmes, then you haven't been tested by fire with the length and circuitousness of Victorian writing.

It could take a page or paragraph to describe how a character moved. It's at once beautiful, savory, complete, and exact. However, readers may complain that it's simply unnecessary verbiage. I'll give you an example: I waited where I was, to ascertain whether his object was to come to close quarters and speak, on this occasion.

To my surprise, he passed on rapidly, without saying a word, without even looking up in my face as he went by. This was such a complete inversion of the course of proceeding which I had every reason to expect on his part, that my curiosity, or rather my suspicion, was aroused, and I determined, on my side, to keep him cautiously in view, and to discover what the business might be on which he was now employed.

His action surprised me, so I followed him to discover what his intentions were. If this was, in fact, how it was written, then the story would be pages and selling as a cheap, mass-market paperback best read on a beach vacation.

The Woman in White Summary

Look Inside Reading Guide. Reading Guide. Generally considered the first English sensation novel, The Woman in White features the remarkable heroine Marian Halcombe and her sleuthing partner, drawing master Walter Hartright, pitted against the diabolical team of Count Fosco and Sir Percival Glyde. Secrets, mistaken identities, surprise revelations, amnesia, locked rooms and locked asylums, and an unorthodox villain made this mystery thriller an instant success when it first appeared in , and it has continued to enthrall readers ever since. Collins brilliantly uses the device of multiple narrators to weave a story in which no one can be trusted, and he also famously creates, in the figure of Count Fosco, the prototype of the suave, sophisticated evil genius.

A young painter stumbles upon an assortment of odd characters at an English estate where he has been hired to give art lessons to beautiful Laura Fairlie. Among them are Anne Catherick, a strange young woman dressed in white whom he meets in the forest and who bears a striking resemblance to Laura; cunning Count Fosco, who hopes to obtain an inheritance for nobleman Sir Percival Glyde, whom he plans to have Laura marry; Mr. Fairlie, a hypochondriac who can't stand to have anyone make the slightest noise; and eccentric Countess Fosco who has her own dark secret.

Walking late one night, Walter Hartright Gig Young sees a mysterious woman in white who promptly vanishes. A man in a carriage explains that a woman recently escaped from a nearby asylum. As the carriage drives by, Walter glimpses another man hidden inside. Walter reaches his destination, which is Limmeridge House owned by the Fairlies, where he has been hired to teach drawing.

The Woman in White

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Our story beings with Walter Hartright helpfully telling us that he's about to tell us a story. Glad he gave us that head's up. Walter actually gathered a lot of testimony and letters from people to tell us a dramatic and totally true story. Cue the Law and Order theme song. So Walter is an art teacher who lands a gig teaching two sisters how to draw. Before heading out to the sisters' house, he meets a mysterious woman dressed entirely in white who has just escaped from a lunatic asylum. Walter heads to Limmeridge House, where he promptly becomes BFFs with the older sister, Marian, and falls in love with the younger sister, Laura.

The Woman in White Summary

A thriller promises its readers suspenseful thrills, just as The Woman in White did when it first hit the stands in , and which it continues to do to this day—despite the fact that our social mores have changed considerably since the Victorian era. The encounter is both unexpected and cinematic. The dark, deserted road, coupled with the late hour contrasts vividly with the light touch of the extraordinarily dressed woman and her mundane question. Walter quickly learns that the woman dressed in white is Anne Catherick, an escapee from a lunatic asylum, and that she bears a striking resemblance to the innocent heiress, Laura Fairlie, with whom he falls in love. The Woman in White and its contemporary counterparts are anchored by a common set of preoccupations.

The events described in the novel take place in the s in England. A young painter from London, Walter Hartright , secures a position as an art teacher at Limmeridge House in Cumberland, which belongs to Frederick Fairlie.

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The Woman in White

Check out what's streaming this month. See the full list. In Victorian England, Laura and her half-sister Marian are entwined in a terrifying web of deceit. Laura's doppelganger, a mysterious woman dressed all in white, may hold the key to unlock the mystery.

Walter Hartright , a young drawing teacher who lives in London, needs a job and an escape from the city for the autumn months. Pesca tells Walter that he has found a job for him teaching art to a pair of young ladies in Cumberland, at a place called Limmeridge House, in the employment of a man named Mr. Walter is somewhat uneasy about the job but accepts. On the road he meets a young woman dressed head to toe in white clothes. She asks him the way to London and walks with Walter to the city. On the way, she asks Walter if he knows many powerful men there, and mutters something about a certain Baronet.

The Woman in White 2018 plot summary: What is the plot of The Woman in White?

Noted for its suspenseful plot and unique characterization, the successful novel brought Collins great fame; he adapted it into a play in This dramatic tale, inspired by an actual criminal case, is told through multiple narrators. Frederick Fairlie, a wealthy hypochondriac, hires virtuous Walter Hartright to tutor his beautiful niece and heiress, Laura, and her homely, courageous half sister, Marian Halcombe. Glyde is assisted by sinister Count Fosco , a cultured , corpulent Italian who became the archetype of subsequent villains in crime novels. Through the perseverance of Hartright and Marian, Glyde and Fosco are defeated and killed, allowing Hartright to marry Laura. The Woman in White.

Generally considered the first English sensation novel, The Woman in White features the remarkable heroine Marian Halcombe and her sleuthing partner.

Published in , one of the two novels with The Moonstone for which Collins is most famous. It firmly established his reputation with the reading public and helped raise the circulation of All the Year Round. As Smith, Elder found to their cost, 'everyone was raving about it. Ellis described how The Woman in White was so popular that 'every possible commodity was labelled "Woman in White".

The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins 's fifth published novel, written in It is considered to be among the first mystery novels and is widely regarded as one of the first and finest in the genre of " sensation novels ". The story is sometimes considered an early example of detective fiction with protagonist Walter Hartright employing many of the sleuthing techniques of later private detectives. The use of multiple narrators including nearly all the principal characters draws on Collins's legal training, [1] [2] and as he points out in his preamble: "the story here presented will be told by more than one pen, as the story of an offence against the laws is told in Court by more than one witness".

We will use your email address only for sending you newsletters. Please see our Privacy Notice for details of your data protection rights. After this encounter, he is hired as a drawing master by Frederick Fairlie played by Charles Dance to teach his niece Laura Olivia Vinall and her devoted half-sister, Marian. While in Limmeridge, Walter realises that the mysterious woman in white he saw is connected to the family.

Sensation fiction thus fused the Gothic romance with the Realist novel, finding horrors not in some fantastical Medieval castle, but behind the doors of apparently normal suburban semi-detached houses, where secrets festered and multiplied.

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Comments: 3
  1. Zulkizahn

    It agree, very useful message

  2. Gukinos

    It is not logical

  3. Momuro

    I understand this question. I invite to discussion.

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